Home > Hefeweizen, Wheat Beer > Rothaus Hefeweizen (336 of 1001)

Rothaus Hefeweizen (336 of 1001)

Rating: 3.75

It’s been a long wait since my last review of a beer to feature in the 1001 beers list, far too long in fact, with the last one being when I tried a bottle of De Dolle’s Stille Nacht back in July and added the review here the next month. This one will be my 336th beer from the list and it is one that was only introduced back in 1995, despite the fact that the brewery was founded in the Black Forest area of Germany as far back as 1791. The brewery is one of three state-owned breweries in the country, the others being Munich’s Weihenstephaner and Hofbräu breweries, and it’s known as being a brewery that traditionally added plenty of malts to their recipes so this should be an interesting take on the hefeweizen style. It comes it slightly stronger than is the norm for this type of beer, sitting at 5.4% it’s a fraction stronger than the 4.9% average for a German hefeweizen and another interesting fact is that the brewery was among the first to offer their beer as a ‘hefeweizen zäpfle’ in 330ml bottles to help it appeal to a wider audience.

rothaus-hefeweizen

Appearance (4/5): A slightly darker orange-amber colour than is the usual for the style, likely due to the extra malts used in the brewery process, this one is a cloudy beer that is topped with a two centimetre tall head that formed after quite a gentle poor. Head retention is pretty good it must be said, there is an initial reduction of just under a centimetre but after that the fluffy, almost creamy looking head doesn’t budge much at all. There’s a touch of lacing on the sides of the glass too and it sits well in the glass, looking quite still and inviting.
Aroma (7/10): Semi-sweet opening up, there is a combination of bananas and wheat in the early going with touches of yeast and some lighter bubblegum notes in there too. It’s more malty than normal for the style but as mentioned above, that is apparently a common theme with beers from this brewery. The beer seemed quite lively and fresh on the nose with some background fruits and citrus in there alongside a couple of bread malts and cloves towards the end; a good start.
Taste (7/10): Quite malty with a sweet backing thanks to the banana and bubblegum flavours carried through from the nose, this one starts with some nice fruits and a little clove, touches of yeast and citrus feature too. There was a malty base that came through with touches of bread and the odd bit of spice but on the whole it was quite standard for a hefeweizen, albeit a malty one.
Palate (4/5): Medium bodied and quite fresh, there was amble carbonation from the start and the balance of the beer seemed good too; some early sweetness went well with the malty base and spice. It was a refreshing beer on the way down and proved quite easy to drink as well; nice stuff all round.

Overall (15/20): Quite a nice, well-balanced hefeweizen that was pretty fresh and came through with a lot of malts from the start, There was some nice bread flavours with banana, yeast and cloves on top alongside some touches of yeast and background citrus. It was to drink and enjoyable without being a standout offering or one that I’d go out of my way to hunt down again; I wouldn’t say no to a second either though.

Brewed In: Grafenhausen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Brewery: Badische Staatsbrauerei Rothaus
First Brewed: 1995
Also Known As: Rothaus Hefeweizen Zäpfle
Type: German Hefeweizen
Abv: 5.4%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: Good Spirits Wine & Beer (Glasgow)
Price: £3.00

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  1. May 22, 2017 at 14:09

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