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Kihoskh IPALOT

April 21, 2016 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.7

A final Danish beer for a while now, this one was yet another Mikkeller offering that I managed to try whilst in Copenhagen last month and it was the final beer from the country that I managed to try on my trip; it was my penultimate beer from the trip though, a review of my first Finish beer will follow soon after this one. The beer is the second of two beers I managed to try from Mikkeller that was brewed in collaboration with the Kihoskh store that was located near our apartment in Copenhagen and one that follows on from their Kihoskh Brown Braids Ale that I reviewed here previously. Although it might be my last Danish beer for a while now, Mikkeller have pretty good distribution in the UK so it shouldn’t be too long before I grab something else from them again. This one is an American IPA style offering that I actually tried on my last morning in Copenhagen that thankfully it proved to be a relatively refreshing beer to enjoy that early in the day; here’s what I thought of it.

Kihoskh IPALOT

Appearance (4/5): This one poured a hazy, golden-yellow colour and was topped with a half centimetre tall, white head that had a frothy texture and broke up slowly over the course of the opening minute to leave a touch of lacing on the glass.
Aroma (7/10): Fresh and quite light on the nose, there was some pleasant lemon and citrus notes to open things up alongside some touches of fruit that sat in the background. The beer hinted at some sweetness and there was some apricot and peach coming through alongside faint notes of coriander. Quite a zesty aroma overall, the beer had some orange smells and a few grassy hops in there too.
Taste (7/10): Following on from the nose, the taste opens up quite fresh and zesty with some good floral hops in there and a lot of lemon/citrus flavours. There was again some fainter orange showing as well as the grassy hops from the end of the nose and I got some hay in there too. Towards the middle some light, pale malts came through and there was a touch of lime with peaches and a faint pine bitterness making itself known towards the end.
Palate (4/5): Medium bodied, maybe just a touch lighter and coming through with quite a fresh, lively feel thanks to the citrus. There was a nice tang to proceedings and overall it was a well carbonated, crisp and zesty beer with a faint bitterness towards the end and a few floral touches as well.

Overall (14/20): Quite a fresh and lively beer with strong carbonation and a crisp, zesty flavour that helped things down. The beer was dominated by citrus flavours although the odd tropical fruit did manage to sneak through and the balance wasn’t too bad really. Definitely not an overly complex beer but it was interesting and drinkable whilst also proving itself better than the Kihoskh Brown Braids Ale I tried previously

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Mikkeller
First Brewed: 2013
Type: American IPA
Abv: 6.3%
Serving: Bottle (330ml)
Purchased: Kihoskh (Copenhagen)
Price: 28 Danish Krone (approx. £3.08)

Jacobsen Weissbier

April 18, 2016 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.7

Another new Carlsberg beer now and my third that falls under their Jacobsen banner of beers, this one is a wheat beer that I managed to pick up a bottle of from the gift shop after touring the Carlsberg Brewery & Visitor Centre on a recent trip to Copenhagen. The beer follows on from the India Pale Ale and the Saaz Blonde in the Jacobsen range, both of which I have reviewed here previously, and this one is probably the beer from that I had most wanted to try after the Saaz Blonde and discovering that their Sommer Wit beer is no longer brewed. Despite arriving in Denmark with the intention of not drinking as many Carlsberg beers as most probably do when visiting the country, I actually ended up trying quite a few new ones from the brewery and I am amazed to say that they weren’t all bad. This one will likely be my last new one from them for some time now though, especially considering the choice of beers from them is pretty poor in the UK when compared with their homeland.

Jacobsen Weissbier

Appearance (4/5): A cloudy orange colour, this one is quite bright looking and sits with a thumb-sized, foamy white head that holds pretty well initially whilst leaving a bit of lacing on the sides of the glass.
Aroma (7/10): Semi-sweet on the nose to start things off, the beer had some pleasant banana notes and a little clove in the early going before a few background fruits started to come through. Around the middle some the wheat started showing and I got a few hints of coriander as well which helped the beer seem quite fresh before a little spice rounded things off but overall it was an easy beer on the nose.
Taste (7/10): A pleasantly sweet beer with a taste of banana to kick things off alongside some of the clove from the nose. There was a usual citrus flavours as well that carried through and I got a combination of subtle fruits featuring alongside some grain and even a little caramel sweetness too. Towards the end some bread and pale malts were the order of the day and it was quite a nice tasting beer without being anything special for the style.
Palate (4/5): Medium bodied and quite balance which made it an easy beer to drink and the beer was a well carbonated one too. The background fruits and caramel, as well as the malts, helped to provide a semi-sweet taste and it was a slightly dry mouthfeel at the end but it was also quite fresh and crisp at the same time. Smooth and balanced, easy to drink too, but nothing special when compared to some of the better German hefeweizens out there.

Overall (14/20): Quite a nice, well-balanced hefeweizen that was definitely an easy one to drink and there was just enough going on to keep things interesting without it truly being a special beer. I liked the touches of sweetness dotted about the place and the subtle caramel malts were a nice touch around the middle too; a solid effort from the brewery that’s definitely worth trying if you happen to find it whilst in Copenhagen but it’s probably not one that’s worth going hunting for.

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Carlsberg Brewery
First Brewed: 2013
Type: Hefeweizen
Abv: 5.9%
Serving: Bottle (300ml)
Purchased: Carlsberg Brewery/Visitor Centre (Copenhagen)
Price: 20 Danish Krone (approx. £2.20)

Kihoskh Brown Braids Ale

April 18, 2016 1 comment

Rating: 3.35

The first of two ‘Kihoskh’ beers from Mikkeller that I picked up in the Copenhagen store of the same name on my recent trip to the city and it will be my sixteenth offering thus far from the brewery. I picked this one up alongside a bottle of Kihoskh Ipalot in the same store I grabbed the previously reviewed Tiger Baby, and enjoyed it on my penultimate day in the Danish capital, having only opted for this one after spotting it as part of a multi-buy offer in the Kihoskh store, not realising that at the time that it was a store exclusive collaboration with Mikkeller. As I previously mentioned, Kihoskh was a store I wish I’d know had a basement prior to visiting but despite me not going downstairs, the shop had a massive selection of Mikkeller beers in their fridges (easily the most I’ve seen in one place) as well as a few big name American beers that are pretty much impossible to find in the UK but I’m happy to have went for this one in the since it’s unlikely to be available anywhere else.

Kihoskh Brown Braids Ale

Appearance (4/5): Medium brown in colour with a large, inch tall head that’s foamy looking and holds well initially before halving in size after about a minute and there was quite a few bubbles rising to the surface of the beer, although it took quite an aggressive pour form a head of this size.
Aroma (6/10): This one was a really light beer on the nose sadly, there was some semi-sweet notes and a background caramel aroma to open things up along with a few lighter malts but overall it seemed a touch subdued. There was some faint chocolate coming through around the middle followed by the odd grassy hop and touch of citrus at the end.
Taste (7/10): Like the nose, the taste was a lot lighter than expected from this one with a pretty basic flavour as well. There was some earthy malts and light caramel to open things up before some burnt malts and a little chocolate started to come through but it seemed quite one-dimensional in the early going. There was some touches of citrus and orange that sneaked through with a semi-sweet bitterness that was complimented by some citrus and floral hops towards the end of this one; nice enough but certainly not as dark or full of flavour as I’d expected.
Palate (3/5): A very smooth beer that came through with some subtle sweetness and a moderate bitterness but still seemed weak and lighter than expected, sitting somewhere around a light-medium bodied beer. It was fairly easy-going but definitely basic with average carbonation and a pleasant balance.

Overall (13/20): This one was at times an interesting beer with a few hints of a light IPA coming through but to be honest it was also a pretty forgettable beer with the nose a little weak and the taste seeming quite one-dimensional but other than that it was okay I guess. I’d been expecting a lot more malts and roasted flavours, perhaps with a lightly hopped, bitter taste that hinted at some sweetness but what I got was a basic, light and disappointing beer (by Mikkeller standards).

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Mikkeller
First Brewed: 2015
Type: Brown Ale
Abv: 5.0%
Serving: Bottle (330ml)
Purchased: Kihoskh (Copenhagen)
Price: 28 Danish Krone (approx. £3.08)

Carlsberg Brewmasters Collection IPA

April 18, 2016 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.2

Another new beer from Carlsberg now and the only beer from their Brewmasters Collection series that I managed to try whilst in Copenhagen recently. This one is the brewery’s attempt at grabbing a piece of the craft beer market with a dry-hopped, American style IPA that was developed at the brewery’s Copenhagen location but is apparently brewed around Europe and under a few different names in different markets but either way, I think it is the first IPA from the brewery that I’ll have tried other than their Jacobsen India Pale Ale which I also sampled over in Copenhagen. This particular offering was introduced in 2014 and is a can that I picked up in a 7-Eleven store one even after spotting it in a number of different shops throughout the city but only being inspired to grab a can after releasing I’d tried the rest of 7-Eleven’s pretty poor selection of beers already; as always though, it’s a new beer so I won’t complain too much.

Carlsberg Brewmasters Collection IPA

Appearance (4/5): Quite a clear, bright beer with an orange to amber body and a thumb sized, creamy coloured head that’s thick looking and holds fairly well over the opening minutes; this one definitely looks better than I’d expected it would.
Aroma (6/10): Light citrus notes and a decent amount of caramel open things up here, there was some solid sweetness coming through alongside a few tropical notes and a touch of pine. Towards the middle the sweet malts and earthy notes started to take over but some background fruits persisted. It was a decent smelling beer overall, almost seeming more like an American pale ale than an IPA but it was enjoyable nonetheless, despite the fact it could have benefited from being slightly more pronounced as well.
Taste (6/10): This taste of this one matches the nose well with a nice caramel sweetness and malty flavours to start things off. There was a couple of earthy flavours and some bread in there as well before grains and a faint citrus featured towards the middle onwards; most notably some orange and the odd floral flavour. Again it wasn’t a bad beer at all but like the nose, if it’d had been slightly stronger that would have been nice.
Palate (3/5): Medium bodied and coming through with a moderate bitterness, the beer was easy to drink but it seemed a touch watery in areas without seeming overly bland. There was moderate carbonation and the finish was a semi-dry one but there wasn’t too much excitement about this one really.

Overall (12/20): Quite an average beer from Carlsberg on the whole here, there was some nice bitterness and a strong caramel sweetness but it was a little weak and watery in areas which was disappointing. The aroma was quite good to start but like the taste, it too faded towards the end and nothing in the beer really stood out or grabbed your attention. Definitely a step up from a regular Carlsberg, but then again most things are so this isn’t really a beer to look out for I’m afraid.

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Carlsberg Brewery
First Brewed: 2014
Full Name: Carlsberg Brewmasters Collection India Pale Ale
Type: American IPA
Abv: 5.2%
Serving: Can (500ml)
Purchased: 7-Eleven (Copenhagen)
Price: 20.95 Danish Krone (approx. £2.39)

Nørrebro New York Lager

April 18, 2016 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.2

Another beer from my recent trip to Denmark now, this time a first beer from the Nørrebro brewery based in Copenhagen and one that I managed to try on-tap in an Italian restaurant on my penultimate night in the city last month. The beer is a premium lager brewed using North American cascade hops, apparently in the pre-prohibition style with quite a malty taste. Founded in 2003 by ex-Carlsberg brewmaster Anders Kissmeyer, this was one of the brewery’s first beers when it launched but is sadly not one of the brewery’s two beers that appear in 1001 beers list; that honour going to both their Bombay Pale Ale and Little Korkby Ale offerings.

Nørrebro New York Lager

Appearance (4/5): Light bodied and clear, this one is an amber gold colour and is topped with a quarter centimetre head that’s a foamy white and just about covers the surface, leaving a touch of lacing on the sides too.
Aroma (6/10): Starting with quite a standard lager aroma, there is some solid malts and a touch of corn to open things up before some faint grain and a further malty sweetness come through. The usual grassy hops and hay were both present around the middle and a hint of citrus made an appearance towards the end as well. It wasn’t the most complex or interesting nose but on the whole it wasn’t a bad one either.
Taste (6/10): Beginning with a nice helping of pale malts and sweetness, there is a bit of citrus following on behind as well as some faint corn and a tiny bit of skunk. There’s wasn’t much overly pronounced about the taste either, save for some earthy malts around the middle and a few lager hops and grassy flavours. Some bread malts came through towards the end and I got some faint bitterness as well but again it was quite basic tasting without being disappointing.
Palate (3/5): Light-medium bodied and quite crisp, this one had a tangy feel thanks to the citrus coming through and there was a malty sweetness throughout as well. A faint touch of skunk did come through and overall the beer was quite light and basic with moderate carbonation making it a drinkable but not a very interesting beer.

Overall (12/20): Quite a basic and fairly average pale lager overall here, this one was drinkable but fairly light overall for the most part. There was some nice malts and a little sweetness in short bursts throughout but not much else grabbed my attention and it seemed too much like a regular macro lager for my liking; I can’t imagine it’s one I’ll go for again to be honest.

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Nørrebro Bryghus
First Brewed: 2003
Type: Premium Lager
Abv: 5.2%
Serving: Draught (400ml)
Purchased: Mama Ludbas, Copenhagen, Denmark
Price: 44 Danish Krone (approx. £4.84)

Amager Orange Crush

April 13, 2016 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.8

For the purpose to continuing the recent trend on here of reviewing two beers from the same brewery in turn, here’s my review of another beer from Amager Bryghus and again it is another collaboration from them. This time the beer in question, their Orange Crush session IPA, has been brewed in conjunction with Florida based Cigar City Brewing. Like the Wookiee IPA from Amager and Port City Brewing before it, this one is another beer that I managed to sample on-tap whilst in Copenhagen recently and at the time I was unaware it was a collaboration beer, I just selected it at random from the draft list in the city’s Himmeriget bar on my visit. Since returning from Denmark and looking into the beer a little further, I have discovered that it is quite a highly regarded beer and is currently ranked as the 29th best session IPA overall by RateBeer which isn’t bad going at all. Despite the fact that in the past I wasn’t the biggest fan of this style of beer, I’ve tried a few session IPA’s recently that have started to change my opinion of them slightly and this one certainly done them no harm; I really enjoyed it.

Amager Orange Crush

Appearance (4/5): Orange amber in colour with a few copper tinges, this one was quite a cloudy beer and it was topped with a centimetre tall head that was quite thick and creamy looking. Retention wise the beer held up very well with some great lacing sticking to the sides of the glass and very little reduction in the size of the head over the opening couple of minutes; very nice stuff.
Aroma (7/10): Definitely a fresh beer on the nose, this one opened up with some subtle pine and citrus hops along with a helping of orange which was to be expected given the name of the beer. There was some pleasant background fruits that included a little mango and a few tropical fruit hints as well but nothing seemed to overpower and the balance on the nose was a good one. There was a few touches of spice towards the end and overall the beer was quite refreshing and enjoyable on the nose.
Taste (7/10): Matching the nose in the early going, this one is again quite hoppy and fresh with some strong citrus notes and a bit of apricot and mango. Some further tropical fruits start to appear towards the middle of the beer and I also got a few caramel malts that weren’t present with the nose and which helped at a faint sweetness to proceedings. It wasn’t an overly complex beer flavour-wise but it was still a nice one that went down easy.
Palate (4/5): A very fresh beer that was also quite hoppy with a lot of bitterness and resinous pine showing throughout. There was quite a nice tang to the beer and it came through with a medium body that was quite smooth but sharp, There was light-medium carbonation and a good balance which helped make the beer an easy one to drink despite the strong bitterness.

Overall (16/20): This one was a very enjoyable beer, even more so for a session IPA though as it didn’t seem to compromise on flavour and there was plenty of bitterness showing throughout. Despite not being overly complex, the beer was fresh and came with a nice mix of tropical fruits and citrus as well as some faint sweetness around the middle for the caramel malts. It was an easy beer to drink and one that I’d happily go for again; excellent stuff.

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Amager Bryghus / Cigar City Brewing (collaboration)
First Brewed: 2014
Full Name: Amager/Cigar City Orange Crush
Type: Session IPA
Abv: 5.0%
Serving: Draught (400ml)
Purchased: Himmeriget, Copenhagen, Denmark
Price: 45 Danish Krone (approx. £4.95)

Wookiee IPA

April 8, 2016 1 comment

Rating: 3.95

This one is another beer that I managed to try on my recent trip to Copenhagen and it is actually a collaborative offering brewed by Amager Bryghus, based in the Danish capital, and San Diego based Port Brewing which will make it my first beer from either brewery. Prior to my trip I had actually been looking to try Amager’s regular IPA but I was unable to find it anywhere while in the country and this was the closest to it. I stumbled across this offering on-tap in Ørsted Ølbar on my penultimate day in Copenhagen and was drawn to the beer since it was an Amager brewed one. The beer is a West coast style American IPA that appears to have been brewed on a semi-regular basis since 2011 which is unusual given it is a collaborative offering but I would assume that the brewery is now done solely by Amager and I’ll list it as a Danish offering from them for tracking purposes here.

Wookiee IPA

Appearance (4/5): Sitting a slightly darker than average copper colour in the glass, this one has quite a hazy body and a thin, quarter centimetre head on top that is foamy and white looking. Head retention is okay with this one with it starting to fade to a patchy surface lacing after a while but it doesn’t look too bad overall.
Aroma (8/10): The nose of this one kicks off with some good tropical notes and pine, there is a good sweetness off the back of the apricot and mango notes that started to come through towards the middle as well. I got some grapefruit bitterness in there too before some subtle malts and caramel notes showed themselves, some vanilla and butterscotch smells weren’t too far behind either and the beer had quite a complex, varied nose that also had some touches of spice right at the end.
Taste (8/10): Quite a bitter taste to open things up here, this one came through with plenty of resinous pine flavours and some grapefruit hops that featured alongside the tropical fruits that carried through from the nose. Towards the middle there was quite a floral feel to proceedings with some caramel malts starting to appear as well and add some sweetness. This was followed by a little biscuit and bread, a few earthy touches and further sweetness from the vanilla and butter wasn’t too far behind. The finish was again quite bitter with some mango and apricot reappearing alongside touches of pineapple and various other tropical fruits.
Palate (4/5): This one was a medium bodied beer that was incredibly bitter, it was perhaps a touch overdone but the beer still went down well. There was plenty of resinous pine bitterness and a floral feel with a very sharp, dry ending but thankfully some sweetness from the malts and vanilla also came through to balance things out some and the finish was quite crisp. Overall the beer was well carbonated and fairly easy to drink but the hop bitterness was definitely the dominant one here.

Overall (15/20): Definitely a beer that I enjoyed, this one was an intensely bitter and strongly hopped beer that came through with plenty of variety, flavour and complexity whilst also providing a nice kick thanks to the alcohol and the citrus tang. There was a lot of tropical fruits coming through from the start and I got a nice amount of sweetness from that as well as some caramel malts, vanilla and even some butterscotch which helped keep things balanced and interesting. I felt the bitterness could have perhaps been toned down a little but it didn’t take too much away from the beer and it was still a very enjoyable one that I wouldn’t mind having again at some point; it would also be interesting to see how the regular Amager IPA compares to this one as well.

Brewed In: Copenhagen, Denmark
Brewery: Amager Bryghus / Port Brewing (collaboration)
First Brewed: 2011
Full Name: Amager/Port Brewing Wookiee IPA
Type: American IPA
Abv: 7.2%
Serving: Draught (400ml)
Purchased: Ørsted Ølbar, Copenhagen, Denmark
Price: 60 Danish Krone (approx. £6.60)