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Posts Tagged ‘dunkler bock’

Bock Damm (350 of 1001)

June 12, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 2.9

The second ever beer brewed by Barcelona’s Damm brewery and introduced way back in 1888, this beer is still one of the most popular dark beers brewed in a country those beer scene is almost completely dominated by pale, blond lagers. This one is a beer that features on the 1001 beers list and as a result is one that I’ve been looking to try on my last few trips to Spain but was surprisingly unable to find it one previous visits before finally stumbling across it at the tail end of last month when returning to Barcelona. The beer is actually available in a number of pubs and some supermarkets in the city which makes it all the more odd that I wasn’t able to pick it up sooner but I eventually sampled a pint of the stuff in a local bar just off the Placa Reial in Barcelona city centre just over a week ago. Despite the name of the beer, this ‘bock’ is actually much closer to a Munich style dunkel lager and due to it’s lack of bitterness was in the past aimed at female drinkers in its advertising campaigns while the bottle itself features the image of a goat which was added as a play on the fact that the word ‘bock’ translates from German as billy-goat.

Appearance (3/5): Dark mahogany coloured with an opaque body and quite a thin head on top that was a foamy texture and slightly off-white in colour; there’s was some touches of lacing on the sides of the glass and the surface was covered well too.
Aroma (6/10): Quite nutty on the nose initially with some basic roasted notes and malts coming through in the early going, there was a touch of caramel in there too. The beer turned out to be lighter than expected on the nose which was surprising given it was such a dark beer but some hints of sweetness did manage to appear alongside some grassy touches nearer the end.
Taste (6/10): The taste started off in much the same vein as the nose with a lot of nutty flavours and some lighter caramel sweetness backing it up, there was faint biscuit and some roasted malts in there too. Around the middle I managed to get some lighter grassy flavours but there was no sign of any hops or bitterness and it came across as quite a basic offering.
Palate (3/5): Light-medium bodied and moderately carbonated, this one was a semi-sweet offering thanks to the touches of caramel coming through at times. There was a fairly basic feel to the beer and it seemed a lot lighter than expected too but the balance was a decent one and it proved easy enough to drink without being an overly enjoyable one.

Overall (10/20): Quite a basic dark beer that wasn’t quite as strong or as pronounced as I’d been expected with the majority of the taste coming through the roasted malts and faint caramel that featured throughout. There was no sign of any bitterness or hops to the beer which sadly made it seem quite bland and basic but the light sweetness off the back of the caramel was at least somewhat enjoyable. It’s definitely not a beer to go hunting for but it’s always nice to check another beer off the 1001 list even if it’s not a great one.

Brewed In: Barcelona, Spain
Brewery: Damm S. A.
First Brewed: 1888
Type: Dunkel
Abv: 5.4%
Serving: Keg (500ml)
Purchased: Cerveceria Canarias, Barcelona, Spain
Price: €4.60 (£4.01 approx.)

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Dolden Berg Sturer-Bock

Rating: 3.3

Another random beer that I managed to try in Berlin when visiting last month, this one is actaully the penultimate beer from the trip that I’ve still to review here. The beer is one that was picked up for me from a Netto supermarket in the Alexanderplatz area of the city and appears to be one that is brewed exclusively for the retailer and available only at their stores, it is brewed at the Jacob Stauder brewery in Essen though and for that reason I’ll list the beer under that particular brewery. The beer is one that I had in the late afternoon back at my hotel and to be honest I wasn’t expecting a great deal from what was essentially a supermarket own-brand, strong beer but it turned out to be at least slightly better than expected without being one I’d rush back and pick up again; here’s how it turned out.

Appearance (4/5): A malty looking, almost caramel amber coloured beer that was semi-clear and had quite a nice and thick looking head sitting on top of it. The head was a foamy looking one, sitting a creamy white colour with some nice lacing on the sides of the glass and looking much better than I’d expected.
Aroma (6/10): Quite a strong beer on the nose, this one kicked off with a lot of caramel malts and some early sweetness as well, it seemed relatively thick on the nose too with some solid sugars and darker fruits featuring nearer the middle. I managed to detect a combination of plums, raisins and some dates with a few sticky grains in there too. Towards the end some of the alcohol starts to show and it did seem stronger than the 7.5% abv. listed on the bottle but it fell short of being overpowering at least.
Taste (6/10): A very malty beer with a lot of sweetness in the early going, there was some strong hops coming through as well with a touch of warming alcohol backing it up. Towards the middle there was some citrus before darker fruits started to come through, I got touches of plum and raisins with some dates rounding things off nicely but it wasn’t an overly complex really.
Palate (3/5): Quite a thick, almost full-bodied beer that was very malty and strong, opening with a lot of sweetness before some touches of warming alcohol and grain showed up. It definitely seemed stronger than the 7.5% listed on the bottle but remained drinkable, it’s definitely not one to rush though. There was an abundance of sugars in there too, coupled with the fruits and this one was quite a sweet offering that was light on bitterness and perhaps just a touch too strong for my liking at times.

Overall (14/20): Quite a boozy and strong offering with a lot of sweetness throughout, it’s probably not the best beer to kick off the night with but it was drinkable and enjoyable at times without ever threatening to be a classic. There was a lot of dark malts and fruits coming through, most notably plums and dates but nothing out of the ordinary for the style really. It’s one that’s worth trying if you stumble across it, mainly because it’s not as bad as you’d expect from the price but it was probably just marginally better than average and not one I’d be likely to pick up again.

Brewed In: Essen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Brewery: Privatbrauerei Jacob Stauder
First Brewed: 2016
Type: Doppelbock
ABV: 7.5%
Serving: Bottle (330ml)
Purchased: Netto (Berlin)
Price: €0.69 (approx. £0.60)

Plaza Vieja Negra

January 13, 2017 1 comment

Rating: 3.25

The third and final Taberna de la Muralla beer that I’ll be reviewing here and also the last review I’ve still to add from my trip to Cuba last year; likely my last review of a Cuban beer for quite some time too I’d imagine. This one is the darkest offering available at the Factoria Plaza Vieja brewpub in Havana and is probably also the darkest beer available in Cuba, certainly of all the Cuban brewed beers anyway. Like the Obscura before it, this is a beer I was really looking forward to hunting down and trying when I was in Cuba and perhaps I’d built it up a little too much in my mind because it definitely wasn’t as good as I’d expected, I actually preferred the Obscura to this one and was looking for something a little darker and malty from this beer. Still, if you find yourself in Havana then it is definitely a beer to go looking for as it’s sadly one of the better beers available in the country; something that’s more a reflection of the state of Cuban beer than on how good this one is though.

plaza-vieja-negra

Appearance (4/5): I was expecting something a little darker but this one turned out to be a caramel amber that was reminiscent of the Obscura from the brewery and was again topped with a foamy white head that was bubbly around the edges. The body looked slightly hazy and head retention was okay as well, not a bad-looking beer so far.
Aroma (6/10): An earthy caramel nose opens things up here and there was some subtle hops following on behind that added some faint bitterness. The beer was quite dry on the nose and has a semi-sweet aroma to it with some darker malts but definitely not as many as I’d have expected. Towards the end some sugars featured and added a little to the sweetness but it could definitely have been a little stronger.
Taste (6/10): Sweet with some nice caramel malts and the odd earthy flavour to kick things off, the beer is again quite dry with a slight bit of citrus showing but it definitely wasn’t a complex beer. There was some toffee and sugars around the middle but very little else of note; still it’s not bad for a Cuban beer.
Palate (3/5): A light-medium bodied beer with a semi-sweet feel to it, this one was quite dry and balanced which allowed it to go down relatively easily. It wasn’t a complex offering but there was some slight citrus adding a subtle tang to go along with a light hop bitterness that kicked things off.

Overall (13/20): A decent third beer from this Havana based brewpub but one that definitely wasn’t as dark or malty as expected; the anticipated roasted flavours were also missing sadly. The beer as a result felt closer to an amber ale than a dark lager but it was still enjoyable given how hard it is to find a decent beer in Cuba at times. While not as good as the Obscura from the brewery in my opinion, it was better than the Clara and is still a beer well worth checking out if you happen to find it in Cuba.

Brewed In: Havana, Cuba
Brewery: Taberna de la Muralla
Full Name: Taberna de la Muralla Negra
Also Known As: Factoria Plaza Vieja Negra
Type: Schwarzbier
Abv: circa 4.2%
Serving: Draught (500ml)
Purchased: Factoria Plaza Vieja, Havana, Cuba
Price: 2 CUC (approx. £1.56)

Weltenburger Kloster Asam Bock (229 of 1001)

March 14, 2014 2 comments

Rating: 4.05

Time for another German beer now, my first since trying Tegernseer Spezial at the start of February and like that offering, this one also features in the 1001 beers list and will be my 229th for the list, the 26th of which will be a German offering. Like my last few beer, this is a bottle I ordered from Beers of Europe before Christmas and since I never got round to trying it before the holiday season finished I had been hoping to hold onto it for another year until I realised that the best before would arrive well before winter so I opted to have it now, before summer comes around. The brewery can lay claim to being one of the oldest in the world having been in operation since at least 1050, coincidentally the same year Weihenstephan traces it’s roots back to and apparently this beer has changed less over the ensuing years than their Bavaria counterpart Weihenstephan’s beers have. This is a beer that I am looking forward to, more so now that I’ve learned a little about the beer and it’s one I can’t wait to try.

Weltenburger Kloster Asam Bock

Appearance (5/5): A deep, dark brown colour with a finger-sized, foamy head that is a light, tan brown colour and holds at about the same level over the opening minutes. The beer is great looking and there is some nice lacing around the sides of the glass as well.
Aroma (8/10): Initially quite sweet and loaded with caramel malts and chocolate notes upfront. A typical bock aroma but a good one at that with some figs and prunes coming through alongside a few subtle hops as well. Some roasted malts also feature and the beer is great on the nose with a lot going on.
Taste (7/10): Again quite sweet with strong caramel malts that mirror the nose well, along with some lighter chocolate and darker fruits that include some prunes, figs and raisins. There is also some roasted malts and the beer is quite rich with a hint of bitterness and a warming, boozy finish to round things off with.
Palate (4/5): Smooth and full bodied with light carbonation and a creamy mouthfeel that goes down well. There is a lot of sweetness to this one although it manages not to overpower or completely dominate things thankfully and there is a touch of bitterness towards the end as well.

Overall (15/20): This one was a very filling and chocolaty beer with a fair amount of sweetness, although this feel short of overpowering the senses. The drink was also quite smooth with a good combination of roasted and sweet malts and although some was noticeable, the alcohol content was well blended with the beer and came as a welcome addition in this case.

Brewed In: Kelheim, Bavaria, Germany
Brewery: Klosterbrauerei Weltenburg
First Brewed: 1997
Type: Doppelbock
Abv: 6.9%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: BeersOfEurope.co.uk
Price: £2.69

Anchor Bock Beer

July 1, 2013 1 comment

Rating: 3.15

This one will be my fifth Anchor beer, all of the previous four where ones that features on the 1001 Beers list and that streak ends with this one, a Dunkler Bock beer that I managed to pick up in Good Spirits Co about a month or so ago based on the breweries reputation and the beers I’ve tried previously from them. First brewed in 2005, this is one of the breweries four seasonal beer and is brewed from January to March every year but hopefully it will prove to be as good as some of the breweries main line of beers. It should also be noted that this will be the first Dunkler Bock beer I will have tried and it’s always nice to try something new I guess.

Anchor Bock Beer

Appearance (4/5): Pours a dark, opaque black with a large, foamy head that is light brown and looks quite creamy. Eventually the size subsides some and settles as a pinky sized one on top of the beer.
Aroma (7/10): Roasted malts and some sweet caramel on the nose with a hint of alcohol but this is minor. There is a darker, fruity aroma with more sweetness following this with raisins and some plum following this.
Taste (5/10): Dark malts from the nose start off the taste along with tonnes of roasted malts and a hint of caramel sweetness with a little grain and alcohol. There is some darker fruits and a hint of chocolate and coffee too. More malty than the smell would suggest with some darker fruits and a rather bitter finish.
Palate (3/5): Light medium bodied with sweet, fruity undertones and bittersweet finish. The beer isn’t as well balanced as I would have liked with the roasted malt taste coming across to strong initially although this does settle down some once the beer has time to breathe some.

Overall (11/20): Not a particularly great beer and definitely the worst of the Anchor beers I have tried thus far sadly. There is a strong helping of roasted malts that could have been toned down somewhat but the fruity undertones were pleasant enough, it just wasn’t enough to save the beer as a whole.

Brewed In: San Francisco, California, United States of America
Brewery: Anchor Brewing Company
First Brewed: 2005
Type: Dunkler Bock
Abv: 5.5%
Serving: Bottle (355ml)
Purchased: The Good Spirits Co. (Glasgow)
Price: £2.40