Archive

Posts Tagged ‘europe’

Warka Classic

October 16, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.0

Another Polish beer now and what might be my last new one for a while now, this is a beer that I actually drank quite a lot of in Poland on my last visit to the country back in August but it’s not one that I gave a proper review at the times. The fact that I never reviewed it whilst in Poland is actually one of the reasons that I picked this one up recently when I found that Asda supermarkets in the UK were selling it, not because I was a huge fan of it in Poland. It’s pretty much a standard, basic pale lager but here’s what I thought of it when I finally tried a bottle and gave it a proper review.

Appearance (4/5): Clear and golden amber with a nice head that sits just over two and a half centimetres tall and looks quite foamy. It’s a white head that eventually settles around two centimetres tall and looks nice, leaving some good lacing on the sides of the glass too.
Aroma (5/10): Quite a clean nose with some biscuit malts and earthy aromas but it’s not a strong one at any point. There was some corn and bread around the middle with a slightly metallic aroma further on but it’s definitely a basic lager smell throughout.
Taste (5/10): Opening with more of the biscuit and corn from the nose, the beer is an earthy tasting one that was again quite light throughout. There was some faint lemon and pepper coming through around the middle with a clean taste and a faint bitterness near the end but it’s nothing to write home about really.
Palate (3/5): Clean but a very basic and light beer, almost weak tasting at times with a faint sweetness coming through as well. It was softly carbonated but easy to drink, likely due to the fact it was so bland.

Overall (12/20): A fairly basic and light Polish lager that was drinkable but didn’t really stand out at any point, although it was a clean and relatively easy-going beer. There was some biscuit malts and corn coming through with a subtle sweetness and some faint lemon at times too but beyond that there wasn’t much to this beer and I doubt it’s one that I’ll have again unless I’m back in Poland.

Brewed In: Warka, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland
Brewery: Browary Warka
First Brewed: Brewery since 1478
Type: Pale Lager
Abv: 5.5%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: Asda (Glasgow)
Price: £1.69

Advertisements

Black Eyed King Imp (Vietnamese Coffee Edition)

October 16, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 4.15

At the time I purchased this one last August it was the strongest canned beer in the world (apparently) but it’s taken me over a year to finally open it. Brewed as a one-off from Brewdog in 2015, this was a beer that I almost didn’t bother picking up given the price but eventually changed my mind last year when placing another online order with the brewery. This one is the Vietnamese coffee edition of the beer and one that I finally cracked open early last month so I was interested to see how the beer had held up in the year since I’d bought it; as it turns out it had aged pretty well.

Appearance (4/5): Oil black and opaque with quick a thick looking pour, the head is a medium, tan brown colour that is about half a centimetre tall but fades to a thin surface lacing after about thirty seconds, covering the centre and some of the edges of the surface.
Aroma (9/10): Quite a strong opening but not one that overpowered, there was some strong coffee and vanilla notes to open things up alongside some dark, roasted malts and plenty of chocolate. I managed to get some sweetness in the early going with some touches of oak and subtle fruits that seemed to work well together towards the end; dates and plums featured strongest but there was also some dates in there as well.
Taste (8/10): Opening with a lot of chocolate and a solid sweetness off the back of this, the beer also had some subtle vanilla flavours and sugars coming through in the early going. Further on some oak and dark, roasted malts from the nose started to come through alongside a few creamy touches and more coffee. Towards the end there was a few dark fruits with plum and raisin seeming the most pronounced and continuing what the nose had earlier started.
Palate (4/5): Smooth and full-bodied with soft carbonation levels and quite a dark, rich feel to proceedings. There was a lot of complexity to the beer and the balance was quite good too, it was a lot easier to drink that I’d expected from such a strong beer.

Overall (17/20): Excellent stuff from Brewdog and definitely one of their better beers, this one seemed to hold up well in the year plus since I bought the can. Opening with plenty of coffee, chocolate and vanilla flavours and some nice roasted malts too, this one was a complex but very well-balanced beer that went down quite easily considering the strength. It’s rich but softly carbonated with some darker fruits near the end although things did fade a touch nearer the end too but I guess that’s understandable given how long I took enjoying it; it was a great beer throughout.

Brewed In: Ellon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland
Brewery: Brewdog
First Brewed: 2015
Type: Imperial Stout
Abv: 12.7%
Serving: Can (330ml)
Purchased: Brewdog.com
Price: £9.50

Northern Monk Faith

September 21, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.45

This one is my fifth Northern Monk beer and one that seems to be a new offering for 2017. The beer is one that I picked up from my local bottle shop last month and sampled right at the beginning of September since I wanted to try it fresh. Following on from their Mocha Porter that I tried and wasn’t overly impressed with back in January, this one is my first pale ale from the brewery and it was one that I was quite looking forward to given the brewery’s love of hop-filled, bitter beers. Thankfully the beer was a little better than the last offering from the brewery that I tried but it wasn’t a great one in truth, here’s what I thought of it when I drank it either this month.

Appearance (4/5): Fairly light looking with a light amber to golden body that is slightly cloudy and topped with a two and a half centimetre tall head that is white and holds well initially. There is a little lacing left on the sides of the beer and the head holds for the first couple minutes too; a nice start.
Aroma (6/10): Slightly fresh on the nose with some hoppy touches and a citrus aroma that is complimented by some pale malts. It’s a little basic overall but some grassy notes and lemon come through alongside a faint caramel smell; it could definitely have been a little stronger though.
Taste (6/10): Opening with a citrus and lemon combination, the beer is fresh with some earthy hops and biscuit. It’s a clean and fresh with touches of biscuit and cereal coming through nearer the middle and a faint bitterness to see things out; again it’s a relatively basic offering.
Palate (4/5): Clean and quite crisp, the beer is light-medium bodied and quite fresh too. It’s an easy to drink offering that came through with a nice balance and some floral touches later on.

Overall (13/20): This one was an okay pale ale from Northern Monk, it was a little basic at times and it wasn’t as bitter or hopppy as I’d expected either. It was a drinkable offering with some citrus and touches of sweetness but it’s not one I’d have again I’m afraid and it was a little bit of a disappointment to boot.

Brewed In: Leeds, Yorkshire, England
Brewery: Northern Monk Brew Co.
First Brewed: 2017
Type: American Pale Ale
Abv: 5.4%
Serving: Can (440ml)
Purchased: Good Spirits Co. Wine & Beer (Glasgow)
Price: £3.20

Guinness Antwerpen Stout

September 21, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 4.2

The final beer that I picked up on my recent trip to Ireland now and what will be, I think anyway, my thirteenth beer from Guinness and one that I was surprised to see when I stumbled across it in a Tesco supermarket in the north of the country. This one is apparently a beer that has been available to the Belgian market since 1944 and also goes by the ‘Guinness Special Export Stout (Belgian Version)’ name as well. Coming in at 8%, it’s definitely one of the stronger offerings from the brewery that I’ve tried and I was also quite surprised at how cheap it was selling for. Following on quickly from the brewery’s Milk Stout, I went into this one with high hopes and thankfully I was not disappointed.

Appearance (4/5): Very dark ruby in colour with a larger than expected head, it sat about three centimetres tall and was a tan beige colour with a foamy texture that had the odd bubble through it as well. After about a minute or so it starts to lose some of its initial height but it’s got quite good retention given the strength of the beer.
Aroma (8/10): Quite a strong and rich nose initially with some chocolate and plenty of sugars coming through that give the beer a nice sweetness to it. There was definitely a lot more complexity to the beer than expected from the brewery with some rich notes and touches of coffee making an appearance around the middle. Towards the end some darker fruits begin to come through and round things off; raisins and plums with the odd date making up most of the aroma right at the end.
Taste (9/10): Opening with a combination of chocolate malts and further sweetness from the sugars, there was some coffee following on behind and the taste definitely matched the nose in the early going. There was some darker fruits that seemed to appear much sooner than they did with the nose, again there was dates, raisins and some plum which added some complexity to proceedings. Overall it was a rich taste with some roasted malts right at the end and it was stronger than expected too.
Palate (4/5): Medium bodied and quite rich with a sweetness to it in the early going that was relatively complex and very smooth. The alcohol content was fairly well hidden with a faint touches showing nearer the end but it was still a strong beer that was well carbonated and quite easy to drink too.

Overall (18/20): This one was a very nice beer from Guinness and easily one of the best, if not the very best, that I’ve tried from the brewery so far. There was a lot more complexity to the beer than anticipated with it coming through quite rich and sweet, plenty of chocolate and darker fruits featuring alongside some nice coffee and roasted flavours. It was a balanced and smooth offering that went down much easier than I thought it would and it’s definitely a beer that I’ll be on the look out for again.

Brewed In: Dublin, Ireland
Brewery: St. James’s Gate Brewery
First Brewed: 1944
Also Known As: Guinness Special Export Stout (Belgian Version)
Type: Foreign / Export Stout
Abv: 8.0%
Serving: Bottle (330ml)
Purchased: Tesco (Enniskillen)
Price: £1.68

Boyne Amber Ale

September 21, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.45

The third of the three beers from the Boyne Brewhouse that I managed to pick up while over in Ireland at the end of last month and the start of this one; the beer follows on from Boyne’s Saison that was quite disappointing and their only marginally better Pale Ale. I’m hoping it’s a case of saving the best to last with this one though and hopefully it will prove to be a better beer, otherwise I can’t see this being a brewery that I pick any more beer from up when I’m next in Ireland later this year.

Appearance (4/5): A darker, almost caramel colour that has a half centimetre tall, bubbly head that is a creamy white and slightly foamy looking but manages to cover the surface well. The head retention was okay too, initially sitting well then start to break up a little after about forty-five seconds to a minute later with a patch of lacing holding in the middle.
Aroma (6/10): Quite a malty nose with some sweetness in the early going too, there was some caramel notes with the odd sugar to back them up and hints of bread not too far behind either. A couple of faint biscuit notes featured towards the middle alongside lighter hops and a earthy aroma but it could have used being a little stronger in my opinion.
Taste (6/10): Semi-sweet with a little caramel and the odd biscuit note coming through, there was a touch more sweetness than there was with the nose and I managed to get some earthy flavours coming through soon after. A combination of sugars and some bread malts featured around the middle with a moderate bitterness seeing things out but again the beer wasn’t quite as strong as I’d have liked.
Palate (4/5): Light-medium bodied and sweet with a few sugars featuring from the start. The beer was relatively crisp and slightly dry at times whilst the nose in particular was a little weak but the balance wasn’t a bad one and it was easy to drink. Carbonation levels were about average for the style of beer and there was a nice bitterness to see things out as well.

Overall (13/20): Not a bad amber ale and easily the best of the three beers from the brewery that I’ve tried now, although it was still a little weak at times and far from a classic offering. Opening with a nice helping of sweetness that was backed up by pleasant biscuit malts and some caramel flavours, this one was a balanced beer that proved quite easy to drink throughout without being anything special. It was crisp and dry, especially towards the finish with a nice bitterness to see things out as well, although I’d have liked it more had it been a little stronger.

Brewed In: Drogheda, Count Meath, Ireland
Brewery: Boyne Brewhouse
First Brewed: 2017
Type: Amber/Red Ale
Abv: 4.8%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: Reilly’s (Lisnaskea)
Price: £1.67

Boyne Pale Ale

September 19, 2017 1 comment

Rating: 3.1

Only my second from the County Meath based Boyne Brewhouse and the second of three beers from them that I picked up when visiting Ireland at the end of August. When visiting a local bottle shop in the north of Ireland I managed to pick this one up along with their previously reviewed Boyne Saison that I found quite disappointing and another beer from them that I’ve yet to review here, their Boyne Amber Ale. This one also goes by the less obvious name of ‘Born in a Day APA’ and is an American pale ale style offering that I was definitely looking forward to trying when I picked it up but given how average and unlike a saison the last beer from them I tried was, I began to have doubts prior to opening this one; here’s what I thought of it anyway.

Appearance (4/5): Quite cloudy to start with a bright amber body that was topped with a thin, half centimetre head that was bubbly and white before fading after about thirty seconds to leave a thin surface lacing that had more build up around the edges.
Aroma (6/10): Fresh and quite lively with some citrus in the early going before the biscuit malts and floral hops start to make themselves known. There was a little sweetness coming through with touches of pine and a few pale, almost earthy malts towards the middle. It’s a relatively clean nose with some bitterness sneaking in but the balance was good and it was a pleasant enough start.
Taste (5/10): Pine hops and lots of biscuit flavours kick things off here, there was some earthy bitterness and touches of citrus not too far behind either though. Whilst seemingly not as fresh as the nose was, the beer was some grassy touches and a nice helping of earthy malts around the middle but towards the end it started to seem a little one-dimensional and boring at times, it proved to be a little basic tasting too.
Palate (3/5): Medium bodied and quite fresh with a crisp and floral feel, there was a subtle tang coming through at times too and the beer seemed balanced.  Overall it was a basic beer on the palate with average carbonation levels for the style and some dryness at the end.

Overall (12/20): The better of the two beers that I tried from the brewery so far but this one was still quite an ordinary pale ale that was closer to an English one than the American one advertised, there was more of a biscuit and earthy malt taste than I’d have expected from an American pale ale although some lighter citrus and floral touches did feature. It was well carbonated and crisp but beyond that it was quite an average and not one that I’d seek out again really.

Brewed In: Drogheda, Count Meath, Ireland
Brewery: Boyne Brewhouse
First Brewed: 2017
Also Known As: Boyne Brewhouse Born in a Day APA
Type: American Pale Ale
Abv: 4.8%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: Reilly’s (Lisnaskea)
Price: £1.67

InishMacSaint Pure Foundered

September 19, 2017 Leave a comment

Rating: 3.35

A fourth beer from Fermanagh based InishMacSaint here and my first from them since trying their Muck Savage wheat ale on Christmas Day back in 2015. The first beer from the brewery that I ever tried, their self-titled InishMacSaint proved to be quite an enjoyable offering but the Muck Savage as well as their Lough Erne Porter that I have tried since never really excited me much; both were drinkable but nothing special sadly. I picked this one up when I spotted it at a local bottle shop in Fermanagh last month with the hope that it would be an improvement on the last couple from the brewery; here’s what I thought of it when I tried it a couple of weeks ago.

Appearance (3/5): Bright golden to yellow in cloudy with a cloudy body but a head that disappeared quiet quickly, even after an aggressive pour from the bottle. It more of a thin and bubbly white lacing that formed above a few fine bubbles that were rising to the surface of the beer.
Aroma (6/10): Quite light on the nose with some citrus and floral touches opening things up alongside a faint hint of orange and some cloves towards the middle. There was an almost witbier like aroma to this one at times with some background fruits helping to keep things fresh but it was far from the strongest beer out there.
Taste (7/10): Quite fruity and opening with a nice combination of citrus and orange flavours before the cloves from the nose started to come through. There was a little wheat this time around too which lent weight to the beer seeming like a witbier at times as well. There was some floral bursts around the middle with the odd pale malts and some grassy flavours sneaking in too but again it wasn’t an overly pronounced offering from the brewery.
Palate (4/5): Medium bodied but perhaps a little lighter than I’d have liked to see, the beer was quite fresh and lively though with above average carbonation and some good floral bursts too. There was a dry and crisp feel to this one that seemed to have a nice balance as well; decent stuff from InnishMacSaint.

Overall (13/20): This one was a slightly better than expected offering from the brewery, I’d not been overly optimistic about this one after the last couple from them weren’t overly enjoyable but this one turned out okay without ever really exciting or hitting the heights of their original InishMacSaint beer. The beer started relatively poorly thanks to its lack of head and weaker than expected aroma but things definitely picked up a little with the nose and some nice citrus flavours started to appear alongside basic fruits. At times the beer was much closer to a witbier than a Belgian pale ale with wheat, cloves and the odd spice all featuring but it proved an easy one to drink whilst staying fresh throughout.

Brewed In: Drumskimly, Derrygonnelly, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland
Brewery: Inishmacsaint Brewery
First Brewed: 2017
Type: Belgian Pale Ale
Abv: 6.0%
Serving: Bottle (500ml)
Purchased: Reilly’s (Lisnaskea)
Price: £2.49